1934 Plymouth

FOR SALE

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GENERAL:

I bought this car almost a year ago. When I bought it, the plan was to do a few things to it then sell it. Time has not permitted me to do much to it, and other projects have come up, so it is time for me to sell it now!

Over all this is a very solid and very nice car. It is perched on the fence between being a great “driver” antique and being a great “driver” street rod. One of the previous owners was in the process of making it into a street rod. When he passed away the modifications stopped. I will explain all this in the following sections.

MECHANICAL:

ENGINE: The engine is original and seems to be in very good condition. The oil pressure runs over 40 pounds and the cooling system does a good job of keeping the car cool. I have driven it here in Colorado, but not in high temperatures like you might have in Arizona or South Texas. The engine starts well, with just a bit of choke. The starter is freshly rebuilt. The engine/car has been converted to 12 volt and rather than the 1934 generator there is a modern alternator installed. The alternator is also freshly rebuilt. In addition I have a newly rebuilt carburetor which has not been installed, but goes with the car. There is a throttle lever inside the car that allows the driver to adjust the idle up a bit if conditions require it.

 

TRANSMISSION: The transmission is original and shifts well, but it seems a bit loose to me. On one occasion while going down hill at about 50 mph it popped out of third gear. The car is certainly drivable as it is, but I would recommend installing new bearings in the transmission. I have not removed and disassembled it, but I don't see any signs of bad gears or anything serious that new bearings would not cure. This car has a feature called “freewheeling” which also seems to work just fine. There is a knob on the instrument panel which engages or disengages the “freewheeling” feature. What this does is with “freewheeling” engaged the engine is disengaged from the transmission whenever you let up on the gas pedal. In other words the car simply coast as if it was in neutral, except when the gas pedal is down and it is under power. With the “freewheeling” disengaged the car behaves as a normal car. When you let up on the gas pedal the back pressure from the engine slows the car down. This is a feature that I would recommend leaving disengaged when driving in the mountains here in Colorado.

 

REAR END:

One of the modifications that has been made to this car is the rear end. A modern rear end (I believe it is Ford) has been installed. The gears are incorrect for the car as it now stands. The rear end presently installed seems to be in good condition and the rear brakes work just fine. In addition to the rear end presently installed I have a stock rear end which came from a 1934 Plymouth coupe. This rear end has proper gears and could be installed in the car. It is complete with the brakes. I was told that it came out of a running/driving car so should be usable with some cleaning up.

In my opinion, the existing rear end would be great for a street rod with a modern engine and an automatic transmission, but the stock rear end would work much better for an antique. One could also change the gear ratio in the existing rear end and use it for an antique. Both rear ends are included with the sale of the car.

 

FRONT END:

1934 was the first year that Plymouth offered independent front suspension. The front end appears to me to be original and is in good condition. The steering is good and reasonably tight. I have experienced no issues with the car wandering when being driven. It is of course, old and drives like an old car. The front brakes have been converted to disk brakes. The delima for an antique car is whether to replace them with original brakes or not. In my opinion they are not at all noticable, and they work very well! Stopping the car is important and brakes in the early 1930’s were not what they are today. I would keep the existaing disk brakes even if I was going to drive this car as an antique. It would certainly be interesting to take it to an antique car show and see if anyone notices. I have shown this car twice and no one has noticed the front brakes at all!

 

WHEELS & TIRES:

The wheels are the artillery type of wheels which I believe was an extra cost option in 1934. They are in good condition. The tires have good tread, but I am unsure of the actual age.

BODY & TRIM & INTERIOR:

BODY & TRIM:

The body on this car is SOLID! When the doors close it sounds like a bank vault! The paint on the exterior has great shine and was a quality paint job. It does show some chips and scratches. Paint on a scale of 1 to 10 with one being terrible and 10 being a show car, I would rate this as about a 7. It makes a very presentable car when clean and waxed. The chrome trim is fair for the most part. Some of the chrome has minor pitting and a few places where it is starting to chip and flake. Somehow it is still quite presentable when cleaned and shined. The only real issue with the body is the rubber on the running boards. Look at the pictures and you will see that there are large parts of the rubber mat covering the running boards that is missing. This is one of the things that I intended to replace. The bead that is found between the fenders and the body is also in just fair condition. I had also planned to replace all of the beads.

 

INTERIOR:

The upholstery is in very good condition. There are only a couple of very small spots where there is visible wear. There are a couple of very small stains on the seats. The headliner has a couple of very small holes just above the drivers head. I suspect these are from cigarette ashes. The headliner over all looks very good. The floor mats are old, but still serviceable. All of the gages work except the gas gage. It may work OK, but is missing the needle so it is impossible to tell if it actually works or not. The car has also been equipped with turn signals. This is a functional addition to an antique, and an absolutely necessary addition to a street rod. Whoever installed the turn signals did a poor job of concealing the wiring. This would be an easy fix. The front window rolls out as it should and the door handles and window cranks all work as they should.

One very interesting facet of the front door windows is the function of the wind wings. There are pictures of this. If the wind wing is closed and latched and you roll the window down, then entire window including the wind wing rolls down. On the other hand if the wind wing is open and you roll the window down then just the window glass rolls down. I believe this is a feature of the 1934 Plymouth only.

PICTURES TAKEN BEFORE I BOUGHT THE CAR:

PICTURES TAKEN SINCE I BOUGHT THE CAR:

MOST RECENT PICTURES OF THE CAR:

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This car is for sale locally and on Ebay. If you wish to contact me locally send me an Email.

CLICK HERE TO EMAIL BUD SILVERS